Tips for Concussion

27 Nov

4 Physiotherapy Tips for Concussion

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Sports-related concussions are a common type of sports injury usually caused by a hit to the head or torso leading to a short loss of normal brain function. Symptoms can include a headache or neck pain, nausea, dizziness, or tiredness.

If you or an athlete in your care suffers a concussion, a physiotherapist can work to help speed the healing process and create a safe return to play program. By following the Physio-4 for Sports-related Concussions, parents and coaches can be more aware of when a concussion has occurred and help to protect soccer or hockey players from getting or causing a concussion and keep moving for life. These tips can be adapted for other sports.

1. Monitor the Health of the Athlete

Before the first practice, assess the young athlete’s baseline brain function (memory skills, concentration), and then re-test during the season to help identify the effects of any injury. Know if the young athlete has had a prior concussion, if so have a physiotherapist help set up a program for a safe and prepared return to play. A great screening tool is the SCAT3.

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2. Position and Protect the Head

To prevent giving or receiving a concussion, young hockey and soccer players must learn to protect their heads and avoid dangerous angles of contact. Hockey players should always approach the boards on an angle, and never check from behind. Soccer players should “head the ball” correctly, and keep a protective space around their bodies to avoid bumping heads and straining necks.

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3. Ensure a Gradual Return to Play

If a young player does suffer a concussion it’s imperative that he/she does not return to play too soon; their brain needs time to heal. A physiotherapist can establish an individualized rehabilitation program that will help prevent the incidence of re-injury, guide the young athlete through the recovery process, and help determine when it is safe to return to play. The SCAT3 has a general return to play guideline that can help aid the timing of returning to sport.

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4. Train Specifically for the Sport

Hockey specific off-ice training exercises will improve control of the neck, spine and pelvis, and will help with skating, puck skills and safe body contact to avoid concussion. Soccer players (especially girls who are prone to concussions) should include a neck-strengthening program as part of their conditioning. Younger players should not practice “heading the ball” until they are adequately trained in the proper technique.

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Physiotherapists are the rehabilitation specialists recommended most by physicians. They are university-educated health professionals who work with patients of all ages to diagnose and treat virtually any mobility issue. Physiotherapists provide care for orthopedic issues such as sport and workplace injuries, as well as cardiorespiratory and neurological conditions. As Canada’s most physically active health professionals, BC’s physiotherapists know how to keep British Columbians moving for life.

The Physiotherapy Association of BC created the Physio-4 to share the expertise of its members with fellow British Columbians and those across the globe. Each month, on movingforlife.ca 4 tips are provided to treat specific health or physical conditions that will help keep you moving for life.  BC’s physiotherapists want you to know that if you are injured or in pain, a physiotherapist can help. After all, they are the healthcare professionals physicians recommend most.

PABC Moving for Life

Have you or someone you know suffered a concussion? Visit your physiotherapist or book an appointment with us at Synergy Physio to learn how to speed your recovery and avoid receiving or contributing to a future concussion.

Synergy Physio

Check out PABC’s past Physio4 Tips:Physio4

2013
January – Strains
February – Knee injuries
March – Osteoporosis
April – Back and Pain
May - Tendinopathy (Tendinitis, Tendinosis)
June – Neurological Conditions
July – Sprains
August – Shoulder Injuries
September – Osteoarthritis
October – Joint Replacements

2012
January – Balance
February – Healthy Hearts
March – Running and Walking
April – Lifting
May – Gardening
June – Cycling
July – Golf
August – Swimming
September – Carrying
October – Pre and Post Natal 
November – Hockey
December – Skiing and Snowboarding

Tips for Joint Replacements

20 Nov

4 Physiotherapy Tips for Joint Replacements

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Joint replacement is surgery for people with severe knee and hip damage, in which the surgeon removes damaged cartilage and bone from the surface of the knee or hip joint and replaces it with a man-made surface of metal and plastic. This can relieve pain, help the knee or hip joint work better, and restore patient mobility.

Physiotherapists play a key role in helping more than 80,000 Canadians of all ages recover from total hip and knee replacements each year. After joint replacement, people tend to be less active than their peers. By seeking the help of a physiotherapist, joint replacement patients can reap the benefits of physical activity after surgery including improved fitness and mobility, better balance (that reduces the risk of falls), lower risk of other health problems and an overall improved quality of life. By following the Physio-4 for Joint Replacement, patients who have just had a hip or knee replaced can keep moving for life.

1. Protect Your New Hip or Knee

Joint replacements require precautions and restrictions in movement immediately following your surgery until the joint has healed. Based on instruction from your surgeon, your physiotherapist will advise you on activity and exercise from day 1 to maximize your function within the restrictions.

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2. Increase Your Strength

Seek to gradually do 150 minutes of moderate intensity aerobic activity per week. If this seems daunting, you can even break it into ten-minute bouts and still receive comparable results. Physiotherapists and surgeons recommend walking, cycling, swimming, water exercises, golf and weight training to start. With experience, you can resume skating, skiing and Pilates exercise. Your physiotherapist can provide you with an exercise program that helps regain your strength, flexibility and balance needed to safely resume these and other recreational activities.

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3. Don’t Stress Your New Joint

Activities that are stressful on your new joint or put you at risk for injury are NOT recommended. These include high impact and contact sports like baseball, basketball, jogging, racquet sports, soccer and hockey. Your physiotherapist will advise you on the best activity and exercise options from day one to maximize your day-to-day function and overall fitness within the restrictions. These stressful activities may be safe to eventually reintroduce into your routine. Your physiotherapist can help guide when to return to these sports.

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4. Following Surgery, Use Walking Aids

Do not wean off of walking aids too soon as limping puts abnormal forces through your new joint and other joints in your legs and back. Work closely with your physiotherapist to find the right pace at which to increase your walking and reduce your need for walking aids.

following

Physiotherapists are the rehabilitation specialists recommended most by physicians. They are university-educated health professionals who work with patients of all ages to diagnose and treat virtually any mobility issue. Physiotherapists provide care for orthopedic issues such as sport and workplace injuries, as well as cardiorespiratory and neurological conditions. As Canada’s most physically active health professionals, BC’s physiotherapists know how to keep British Columbians moving for life.

The Physiotherapy Association of BC created the Physio-4 to share the expertise of its members with fellow British Columbians and those across the globe. Each month, on movingforlife.ca 4 tips are provided to treat specific health or physical conditions that will help keep you moving for life.  BC’s physiotherapists want you to know that if you are injured or in pain, a physiotherapist can help. After all, they are the healthcare professionals physicians recommend most.

PABC Moving for Life

Have you recently had a total joint replacement of your hip or knee? Visiting your physiotherapist or book an appointment with us at Synergy Physio to learn how to keep your new joint safe and strong.

Synergy Physio

Check out PABC’s past Physio4 Tips:Physio4

2013
January – Strains
February – Knee injuries
March – Osteoporosis
April – Back and Pain
May - Tendinopathy (Tendinitis, Tendinosis)
June – Neurological Conditions
July – Sprains
August – Shoulder Injuries
September – Osteoarthritis

2012
January – Balance
February – Healthy Hearts
March – Running and Walking
April – Lifting
May – Gardening
June – Cycling
July – Golf
August – Swimming
September – Carrying
October – Pre and Post Natal 
November – Hockey
December – Skiing and Snowboarding

Tips for Osteoarthritis

13 Nov

4 Physiotherapy Tips for Osteoarthritis

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Osteoarthritis is the most common form of arthritis, and although it is often related to aging it is not a normal part of aging. Osteoarthritis breaks down the cartilage in the joints, and when this cartilage is lost, the bones rub together. Over time this rubbing can permanently damage the joint. This results in pain, stiffness, swelling and reduced motion in the joint. Osteoarthritis can occur in any joint, but usually it affects the hands, knees, hips or spine.

Research confirms that physiotherapy can help alleviate the symptoms of arthritis, and that therapeutic exercise, acupuncture and electrotherapy can reduce joint pain. Working with your physiotherapist and following the Physio-4 for Osteoarthritis, can help patients suffering from osteoarthritis keep moving for life.

1. Is it Joint or Muscle Pain?

Muscle pain (within limits) is normal, and can occur when you do something you haven’t done for a while. Joint pain is not normal. If you have had joint pain in the past year and for most days of the month, get a comprehensive assessment from your physiotherapist to determine if your symptoms indicate Osteoarthritis.

joint or muscle pain
2. Build Your Muscles Up

Keep your muscles strong around the arthritic joint to support it. Be physically active with cardiovascular and strength exercise like biking, walking and/or aquatic exercise. Your physiotherapist can provide an exercise program to help you build strength to limit the effects of arthritis once you are diagnosed.

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3. Keep Moving

You can restore and maintain the mobility of your arthritic joint with regular exercise. When increasing your activity or starting your physiotherapy program, give yourself rest breaks during the day to compensate for the increased activity.  Many types of arthritis are characterized by bouts of extreme tiredness that can leave you drained of energy.  Balancing activities, exercise, and rest times is critical to staying healthy and physically active, and to increasing energy.

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4. Use Aids to Help

If you suffer from hand osteoarthritis, your physiotherapists can suggest aids, braces or tools that protect your hand joints and help you manage daily activities. Aids such as ergonomic handles, assistive jar openers, electric can openers, walking sticks and other devices will also help you maintain independence.

aids

 

Physiotherapists are the rehabilitation specialists recommended most by physicians. They are university-educated health professionals who work with patients of all ages to diagnose and treat virtually any mobility issue. Physiotherapists provide care for orthopedic issues such as sport and workplace injuries, as well as cardiorespiratory and neurological conditions. As Canada’s most physically active health professionals, BC’s physiotherapists know how to keep British Columbians moving for life.

The Physiotherapy Association of BC created the Physio-4 to share the expertise of its members with fellow British Columbians and those across the globe. Each month, on movingforlife.ca 4 tips are provided to treat specific health or physical conditions that will help keep you moving for life.  BC’s physiotherapists want you to know that if you are injured or in pain, a physiotherapist can help. After all, they are the healthcare professionals physicians recommend most.

PABC Moving for Life

Have you been diagnosed with Osteoarthritis? Learn how you can keep your joints strong and moving well by visiting your physiotherapist or book an appointment with us at Synergy Physio.

Synergy Physio

Check out PABC’s past Physio4 Tips:Physio4

2013
January – Strains
February – Knee injuries
March – Osteoporosis
April – Back and Pain
May - Tendinopathy (Tendinitis, Tendinosis)
June – Neurological Conditions
July – Sprains
August – Shoulder Injuries

2012
January – Balance
February – Healthy Hearts
March – Running and Walking
April – Lifting
May – Gardening
June – Cycling
July – Golf
August – Swimming
September – Carrying
October – Pre and Post Natal 
November – Hockey
December – Skiing and Snowboarding

 

 

Tips for a Healthy Heart

20 Aug

4 Physiotherapy Tips for a Healthy Heart

Physio4 Healthy Heart

Physiotherapists Therèse Lord (retired) and Allison Ezzat (West Vancouver Aquatic Centre Physiotherapy) log dozens of kilometers walking and running each week to ensure a healthy heart.

You may not think of it this way, but your heart is a muscle and can be trained just like any other muscle. And, like other muscles, it works better and more efficiently if it is exercised and trained on a regular basis. As with any new exercise program, getting advice from a trained, registered physiotherapist is a great first step.

Your physiotherapist can work with you to create an exercise program that is tailored just for you.

1. Even a small amount of movement makes a difference.

A total of 20-30 minutes of a erobic exercise a day, three or four times a week can make a big difference to your heart- plus, it will make you feel great! Your physiotherapist will help you build your physical capacity for your chosen activity.

2. Exercise for your heart can be fun.

Aerobic activities like walking, cycling or swimming are all excellent ways to exercise your heart. If you are more motivated to workout with others, consider joining a walking group or an exercise class.

3. Don’t let a chronic condition prevent you from getting started.

If you suffer from arthritis, osteoporosis, asthma, or another chronic condition, you can still exercise your heart. Your physiotherapist can modify or adapt exercise to make it safe for you.

4. A history of heart attack or heart surgery should not prevent you from beginning a therapeutic exercise program.

After a heart attack or heart surgery, it’s important to rebuild your tolerance for exercise and strengthen your heart gradually. Your physiotherapist can create a therapeutic exercise program that is right for you and your heart.

Physiotherapists are the rehabilitation specialists recommended most by physicians. They are university-educated health professionals who work with patients of all ages to diagnose and treat virtually any mobility issue. Physiotherapists provide care for orthopedic issues such as sport and workplace injuries, as well as cardiorespiratory and neurological conditions. As Canada’s most physically active health professionals, BC’s physiotherapists know how to keep British Columbians moving for life.

The Physiotherapy Association of BC created the Physio-4 to share the expertise of its members with fellow British Columbians and those across the globe. Each month, on movingforlife.ca 4 tips are provided to treat specific health or physical conditions that will help keep you moving for life.  BC’s physiotherapists want you to know that if you are injured or in pain, a physiotherapist can help. After all, they are the healthcare professionals physicians recommend most.

PABC Moving for Life

Are you or a loved one living with a heart conditions? Learn how to life a heart healthy life visiting your physiotherapist or book an appointment with us at Synergy Physio.

Synergy Physio

Check out PABC’s past Physio4 Tips:Physio4

2013
January – Strains
February – Knee injuries
March – Osteoporosis
April – Back and Pain
May - Tendinopathy (Tendinitis, Tendinosis)

2012
January – Balance
February – Healthy Hearts
March – Running and Walking
April – Lifting
May – Gardening
June – Cycling
July – Golf
August – Swimming
September – Carrying
October – Pre and Post Natal 
November – Hockey
December – Skiing and Snowboarding

Tips for Balance

13 Aug

4 Physiotherapy Tips for Balance

Physio4 Balance

Physiotherapists Meena Sran (BC Women’s Hospital) and Clyde Smith (Allan McGavin Sports Medicine Centre) coach their patients on the importance of core strength and balance.

Approximately 30% of older adults will fall at lease once each year. An injury, such as a fracture or sprain, will occur in 50% of those who fall. This in turn can result in a new disability or loss of independence. The good news is that many falls can be prevented. The risk of falling in older adults can be reduced when a physiotherapist prescribes specific exercises, activities or interventions.

If you have fallen or fear you are at risk of falling, your physiotherapist can help.

1. Try to be physically active every day.

Daily physical activity will help to improve your posture, muscle strength and balance. Enroll in a Tai Chi class or supervised exercise program. Your physiotherapist will recommend therapeutic exercise that’s right for you.

2. Go for routine exams.

Have an annual physical assessment with your physiotherapist to detect impairments to your balance. Also, ensure you visit your doctor for an annual physical and have your vision and hearing checked to help you keep tuned-in as you move around.

3. Wear proper footwear.

Wear a good pair of lace-up shoes that will support your feet and ankles, and avoid high heels and slippers because they can increase your risk of slipping and losing balance.

4. Use a cane or a walker.

Aids such as canes or walkers are important to help maintain balance both inside and outside your home. View them as tools to help you keep active, not as signs of weakness.

Physiotherapists are the rehabilitation specialists recommended most by physicians. They are university-educated health professionals who work with patients of all ages to diagnose and treat virtually any mobility issue. Physiotherapists provide care for orthopedic issues such as sport and workplace injuries, as well as cardiorespiratory and neurological conditions. As Canada’s most physically active health professionals, BC’s physiotherapists know how to keep British Columbians moving for life.

The Physiotherapy Association of BC created the Physio-4 to share the expertise of its members with fellow British Columbians and those across the globe. Each month, on movingforlife.ca 4 tips are provided to treat specific health or physical conditions that will help keep you moving for life.  BC’s physiotherapists want you to know that if you are injured or in pain, a physiotherapist can help. After all, they are the healthcare professionals physicians recommend most.

PABC Moving for Life

Are you or a loved one living having issues with balance? Have you sustained a fall?  Visit your physiotherapist or book an appointment with us at Synergy Physio to help decrease your risk of falls and injury.

Synergy Physio

Check out PABC’s past Physio4 Tips:Physio4

2013
January – Strains
February – Knee injuries
March – Osteoporosis
April – Back and Pain
May - Tendinopathy (Tendinitis, Tendinosis)

2012
January – Balance
February – Healthy Hearts
March – Running and Walking
April – Lifting
May – Gardening
June – Cycling
July – Golf
August – Swimming
September – Carrying
October – Pre and Post Natal 
November – Hockey
December – Skiing and Snowboarding

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